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Presentation Dos and Dont's


  • Do think deeply about why the study might matter and in what context. Present this upfront in *concise* form. There should be no correlation between the depth of your thought and the length of your description

  • Do not present slide after slide of literature review. I want the ideas, not proof that youíve done your homework.

  • Do not confuse theory with literature review.

  • Do not approach the methods section from a defensive, justificational point of view that tries to minimize or hide the questionable and/or perverted stuff you did to the data

  • The guiding principle of the methods section should be to document the study so that (a) we the audience can properly interpret the results and (b) replicate the study ourselves

  • Do think deeply about what the results mean. Donít stop at saying H1 and H2 were supported. What are the consequences? This does not mean you should gin up some alleged contributions your study makes but rather that you draw some implications for our understanding of how things work

  • If you report on the relationship between two variables, be sure to think through the possible mechanisms that could relate one to the other. Itís not about whether A causes B but why and how.

  • Do not use formality to signal substance

  • If you think there are major holes/blemishes in your study, do not attempt to hide them with make-up. Instead, restructure the presentation to highlight the problems and why you have them. I guarantee you are not an idiot, so there must be good reasons why things have turned out the way they did. Discuss them.

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